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3DO Emulation



  • @dankcushions I'm not a coder. I'm a networking and security specialist, and an electronics hobbyist with only minor scripting experience. It was not my intention to downplay anyone's efforts, just express my mild frustration that this feature did not work well yet and to see if their were any ways around it I did not know about. I know a great deal of work has gone into this project to make it what it is and I and numerous others are extremely grateful for that.



  • I'm curious how Mega Race performs myself. Has anyone tested it yet? I've used 4DO on PC before and I found it to run quite well on there but haven't tested on the Pi yet simply because of it's experimental status and the fact that it run slow on a Pi 2. Since the Pi 3 is not a huge leap forward in 32-bit mode vs and overclocked Pi 2, I haven't bothered testing with my Pi 3 yet either.



  • @ProxyCell Lol, yeah I'm not surprised about your results with Jaguar emulation since the system is such an odd ball from the design perspective. As I understand it, the system is almost as complex as a Saturn.



  • @dankcushions I agree with you that there are no black and white / cut and dry rules which dictate that system complexity is directly proportional to emulation processing requirements but I think we can likely agree it is a significant factor. But yes your right, because the 3DO didn't enjoy mass market adoption there has most likely been less emphasis on developing and improving emulators for it. Still it has some great games that would be great to see the Pi run one day.



  • @drake999 megarace is terrifyingly slow - the short video clip where the host says his "have a nice death, baby!" was really in slow-motion. with his voice coming across as really deep and guttural. Had I not known what I was playing I would have naturally assumed it was a recording from a microphone lowered into some dark pit to record the sounds of hell and the tormented.

    the racing portion was very slow as well, unplayably so.



  • @ProxyCell Lol, ok thanks for letting me know. I appreciate you testing it for me.


  • administrators

    @ProxyCell lol :-)



  • I found what looks to be a stable overclock for the Pi 3 where you clock the CPU at 1400 MHz, the GPU at 500 MHz and use an overvolt of 6, but given the results ProxyCell received during his testing, I doubt a 200 MHz boost will make much difference. I guess I will have to hold off on 3DO for the time being. Thanks everyone for your input.



  • you're very welcome, i can always test other games assuming they are easy to obtain



  • @drake999 I also have tried overclocking the RPi3 and yes, I have used those exact values and many more. Even at 1300 it was not perfectly stable for me. I had it on 1400 for an entire day of constant testing, different emulators, quitting each one, going back through ES to try different roms out, everything was great until I restarted it and suddenly it went into unstable-mode.

    It got better but still it scared me enough to give up on OC for now

    The dreamcast isn't that bad actually, give that and the PSP a shot. They are just hovering at the borderline.



  • @ProxyCell Hi ProxyCell. Thanks for your continued testing. I suspected that 3DO emulation would continue to demand more processing power, beyond what the Pi is capable of. Not being a coder I can only speculate, but I suspect it is because the emulator is not optimized for this architecture. Thanks very much for your efforts in testing though, I'm sure the information you've provided will not only be useful to me, but perhaps the development community as well. Don't push your Pi too hard, I don't want to see you burn out your CPU. Thanks again for your efforts.



  • @ProxyCell Lol, sorry I thought you were referring to 3DO emulation specifically. I haven't had the guts to overclock my Pi boards beyond the confirmed stable values. If I were a bit richer I might lol. I imagine that stable overclocking speeds on the Pi3 is extremely variable from chip to chip right now, which is probably why overclocking the Pi3 is not officially supported yet. I'm just guessing though.



  • yeah it feels a lot like the original RPi before they had official OC settings. we voided our warrantees by doing it back then. Overall its extremely safe to do as long as you have a heatsink on it.

    A lot of people/companies are going to show you some setups using fans or even full-submersion of their RPi, its required for retropie I have found. I would like to get a heatsink on the bottom of the board though... I will likely go to a local hackerspace and 3D print a barebones case sometime: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:629886



  • My Pi3 hit's about 75 degrees under load I recently found out, despite the fact that I applied heatsinks with good quality thermal adhesive. The only thing I think I could have done differently is use a case with better airflow. In light of this, I doubt I will attain a decent, or even modest overclock without passing 80 degrees under load, at which point the system will likely throttle down anyway unless I disable the safeguards. Based on this, I will probably forget about overclocking for the time being unfortunately.



  • @drake999

    Contrary to popular belief, heat sinks do very little without airflow. You are a small fan away from never temping past 56 or so C. Here's a link to the post where I describe my setup just a bit. - https://retropie.org.uk/forum/topic/1637/first-time-emulator-console-build-questions/6 Scroll up a bit for a good test video I found.

    I'm not overclocked and my idle temps are are around 36 or so degrees C with a game playing ramp up to about 56 or so C.


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