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Using a 9V NES power supply for the 5V RP3



  • Re: Mausberry Shutdown Circuit NES Build Help?

    I am doing almost the exact same project except I am using the original NES Power module and RCA jacks. Can anyone please help me? I am a beginner. I have the mausberry hooked up to my Pi 3, but I want to use the original NES power supply and power cable to run my RP3. I know I have to convert the 9V input to 5V and then somehow get that to plug into (or solder that to my Pi). I was thinking to simply getting a step down converter, stripping the wire off of the male power supply and splicing it onto the step down converter. Any advice or better & cleaner methodologies would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks in advance!



  • @bones you cant just stepdown the voltage. An original nes power supply is ac and the pi uses dc. You can use a dc power supply on an ac system but you cant use an ac power supply on a dc system. So you will need a transformer and bridge rectifier blah blah blah... however without looking it up, the nes power supply most likely doesn’t provide enough amperage to run the pi.



  • Maybe it's an idea to open up the NES power supply, empty it and stuff it with the insides of a Raspberry Pi power supply?



  • @bones you can however easily buy 5v power supplies that have the same connection as the original nes power supply.



  • @morph-x said in Using a 9V NES power supply for the 5V RP3:

    Maybe it's an idea to open up the NES power supply, empty it and stuff it with the insides of a Raspberry Pi power supply?

    If I'm not mistaken, as I currently cannot find my OG NES adapter, the NES adapter converted your wall A/C 120 V power to 9V DC that fed directly into the system.

    If my memory is correct, then he would simply need to find a setup that would step down the 9V input to 5V (Resistors).

    BTW, that is not as easy as it sounds because, though a resistor would give you the drop in voltage, you're going to quickly burn your components if you don't know what you're doing.

    Easiest solution: buy something that already outputs 5V with a minimum of 2.5amps....oh and try to stay away from cell phone chargers. Even if they say they're rated for 5V at 2.5A, they tend to be more trouble than a power supply made specifically for the pie or some other function that is not a cell phone.



  • I had this problem on an old atari, I think i needed to drop from 12v to 9v, I just bunged enough diodes in series to get a big enough voltage drop, worked well.

    However, that doesnt take into account the prviously mentioned issue of if the voltage is ac or dc and if the amperage is enough, which it almost certainly is not.


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