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lr-pcsx-rearmed misconfigured by default



  • I wanted to make sure to mention this somewhere so it could hopefully be fixed in the image being created for the Raspberry Pi 4 prior to official release.

    Using:

    • a fresh image of 4.5.1
    • on a Raspberry Pi 3B+
    • issue with "lr-pcsx-rearmed"

    The core mentioned is configured incorrectly.

    When launching, it attempts to use the core:
    /opt/retropie/libretrocores/lr-pcsx-rearmed/libretro.so

    Which doesn't exist. My solution was to simply make a copy of the file:
    /opt/retropie/libretrocores/lr-pcsx-rearmed/pcsx_rearmed_libretro.so

    Renaming the copy to:
    /opt/retropie/libretrocores/lr-pcsx-rearmed/libretro.so

    I realize this is likely the wrong solution, since I suspect it would be better to correct the core the runcommand is attempting to use to be the full name version, but since I don't know where that is exactly, this did the trick.

    I am pretty new at digging in to the level where I could discover the actual cause of this issue so I regret to say that it took me several hours to fix. (I spent a lot of time chasing down what I assumed to be file capitalization issues, which turned out to not be the problem.) So hopefully someone else will have some time saved by this.


  • Global Moderator

    This issue was fixed in March.

    Installing package updates from binary depend on you using the most up-to-date version of the RetroPie-Setup script so that it knows how to properly configure the installed binaries. Make sure to update the script before installing this or any other updates.



  • I appreciate the information you offered, but this was the stock 4.5.1 image. You seem to be implying that I only partially installed updates, or installed additional cores incorrectly, but that was not the case here. lr-pcsx-rearmed is the only core included in the stock image for PSX. I guess I simply wouldn't have assumed that the current release image in September would be missing fixes that allow the primary emulators to work out of the box for issues that were fixed back in March. To be clear, I understand that the focus right now is Raspberry Pi 4 support, so I get that the image release schedule may be a bit off right now.


  • Global Moderator

    I just downloaded and mounted the stock RPI3 image (md5: eb62ee88bf890e6d9ac9164bcb3e4a23); I can see /opt/retropie/libretrocores/lr-pcsx-rearmed/pcsx_rearmed_libretro.so, and the associated /opt/retropie/configs/psx/emulators.cfghas this library set correctly.

    You are mistaken about having the stock 4.5.1 image installed. The most likely explanation for what you're seeing is that you had version 4.4 or earlier installed, and then manually updated lr-pcsx-rearmed from binary some time between March and today, but your script was not updated with the fix I mentioned from March, and thus installed the module incorrectly. This is user error, so nothing requires fixing.

    My advice stands, and if you still insist that you made a fresh install of 4.5.1, then you should ensure that you haven't downloaded a counterfeit/3rd party image whose version was mislabeled. Always download from the official site only, and verify the checksum after download.



  • No idea what happened. Here's the rundown...

    SD card:
    Sandisk Ultra 256GB
    Literally took it out of its packaging to put the image on it.
    Used balenaEtcher version 1.5.56 to write the SD card.

    Downloaded:
    url: https://github.com/RetroPie/RetroPie-Setup/releases/download/4.5.1/retropie-4.5.1-rpi2_rpi3.img.gz
    File: retropie-4.5.1-rpi2_rpi3.img
    Date: 09/12/2019 @ 9:23 PM

    Checksums and sizes:
    gz md5: eb62ee88bf890e6d9ac9164bcb3e4a23 (766,700,626 bytes)
    image md5: 2a18909f09641b97b505fbb8ae62b0fe (2,580,545,536 bytes)

    Just retried everything...

    • rewrote SD card (same image from a few days ago)
    • put it back into my Pi3B+
    • let it boot, and reboot (resize file system)
    • configure usb snes controller buttons
    • showing RetroPie and Amiga systems.
    • retropie setup (from UI)
    • error running 'git pull' - returned 1 (expected, network not configured yet)
    • configure wifi (switches to raspi-config)
      • set wifi country (US) (switches back out of raspi-config)
      • select SSID, enter passcode, connects successfully
    • configure bluetooth (ps4 - dual shock 4)
    • perform reboot
    • configure dual shock 4 buttons.
    • connect using \retropie
      • copy psx rom
      • copy psx bios
    • restart emulationstation
    • selected and started game
    • worked fine

    I can admit when I was mistaken (though I have no idea how I managed to get messed up in this case). My best theory was just that I downloaded the correct image, but then wrote the wrong image somehow to a brand new SD card.



  • After an evening of pondering this, I have figured out what I did to screw it up. I have created multiple images of RetroPie setups that were reasonably customized and saved piles of things I referred to as "Clean" associated with those. (For example, known good ROMS, BIOS, and Meta Data like Scraper results.)

    What happened was that I missed a step trying to recreate my steps. So here's the abbreviated version of what I did that messed it up.

    • Wrote the correct, unaltered, unupdated 4.5.1 image to the SD card (I really couldn't believe I would have written the wrong image).
    • Copied vast amounts of "Clean" altered configs (for a setup that was designed for SNES controller compatibility, and thus didn't use PSX).
    • Boomie. (At this point, I believe my copying of configs was all it took to scramble it up.)

    It should have been obvious when the pixel art launch screens came up (part of the config I just copied), but I honestly recall thinking "Oh cool, 4.5.1 uses the same pixel art things I liked for launching games."

    Thus, to your point, I had 4.5.1, with a bunch of 4.4 config wedged in manually after the fact. Worse, because my previously configured system never used PSX (not enough RasPi power when I created it, and not enough buttons when using SNES controllers), I had no idea that there might have been a bug with it that had been hiding in what I was copying.

    Thanks for the feedback.



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