Please do not post a support request without first reading and following the advice in https://retropie.org.uk/forum/topic/3/read-this-first

  • @Clyde Any suggestion on how to access EULAs you've already agreed to? I rarely see them available in a text file (seems they're buried instead, unavailable to read once I've already agreed to it). I agree with you by the way. I'm just also frustrated with the barriers as somebody who wants to do things 100% legitimate.


  • @themazingness said in Where to (legally) acquire content to play on RetroPie:

    @Clyde Any suggestion on how to access EULAs you've already agreed to?

    As a Linux user who prefers free software (contrary to a common misconception not neccessarily cost-free, but free to copy and modify, aka "free as in free speech"), I understand your frustration very much.

    Alas, I don't have any special tips in general, apart from searching for the EULA among the installation files, in the software itself, and on the web.

    You also could install it a second time to see the EULA, either on another system or in a virtual machine. Since most EULAs come up right after the start of the installation, it may often be possible to see it and then stop the installation, leaving an existing one intact. But I would strongly recommend a backup beforehand.


  • Next time you could copy/paste the EULA in a file to easy access to what you have agreed to. This off course requires some sort of self organization, but could be worth it if you care very much about the topic.


  • Piko Interactive has published a number of games on Steam (some on GoG too), and I know of at least three of their games that have ROM files available:

    Super 3-D Noah's Ark is a SNES game and the .sfc file is available in the main folder.

    Water Margin is in the SteamLibrary\steamapps\common\Water Margin\res folder, named simply "game" which can be renamed into a .bin file for emulation.

    Nightshade also is in the res folder (also named "game") and can be renamed to an .nes file.

    They have lots of other games, so there are probably other possibilities.


  • @themazingness said in Where to (legally) acquire content to play on RetroPie:

    Piko Interactive has published a number of games on Steam (some on GoG too)

    A link to those on GOG:

    https://www.gog.com/games?devpub=piko_interactive

    (I don't use Steam, so I am not familiar with how to make a similar link there.)


  • @Clyde said in Where to (legally) acquire content to play on RetroPie:

    @themazingness said in Where to (legally) acquire content to play on RetroPie:

    Piko Interactive has published a number of games on Steam (some on GoG too)

    A link to those on GOG:

    https://www.gog.com/games?devpub=piko_interactive

    (I don't use Steam, so I am not familiar with how to make a similar link there.)

    https://store.steampowered.com/publisher/Piko/#browse


  • @Clyde said in Where to (legally) acquire content to play on RetroPie:

    you agreed to in order to use the software

    I can undo it just by sending them an email that undoes it by forcing them to agree to undo it just by reading my email:

    READ CAREFULLY. By reading this e-mail, you agree, on behalf of your employer, to release me from all obligations and waivers arising from any and all NON-NEGOTIATED agreements, licenses, terms-of-service, shrinkwrap, clickwrap, browsewrap, onfidentiality, non-disclosure, non-compete and acceptable use policies ("BOGUS AGREEMENTS") that I have entered into with your employer, its partners, licensors, agents and assigns, in perpetuity, without prejudice to my ongoing rights and privileges. You further represent that you have the authority to release me from any BOGUS AGREEMENTS on behalf of your employer.

    But of course, legalese isn't a magic language society runs on. Society runs on the Golden Rule: "Whoever Has the Gold Makes the Rules"


  • @BenMcLean said in Where to (legally) acquire content to play on RetroPie:

    I can undo it just by sending them an email that undoes it by forcing them to agree to undo it just by reading my email:

    Well, I strongly doubt that this would hold up in court, but as IANAL myself, I would strongly recommend to anyone who also isn't a expert of the legal system in question to consult one before trusting their own layman's guts about it.


  • @Clyde said in Where to (legally) acquire content to play on RetroPie:

    I strongly doubt that this would hold up in court

    Only because of the "Golden Rule"


  • @Clyde Wow, I tried reinstalling the games to read the EULAs a bit, and I'm surprised what I found.

    Atari Vault says you can't play it on unauthorized devices. It's one I thought would be perfectly fine since the console ROMs are freely installed on your computer. But then I wonder "well, I'm not installing Atari Vault on another device, I'm just using the ROMs on one." (Not a rationalization so much as wondering how courts would look at that differentiation). Still, surprised it actually had a strict EULA.

    Taito Legends 2 was equally strict yet ambiguous whether or not you could use the ROMs elsewhere even though they are installed on the drive as is. It did prohibit decompiling, etc. (though extraction is unnecessary so it's a moot point regarding the ROMs). It allowed for backups but said the backups had to be for archival use or the same use granted in the rest of the license.

    Nothing else really had a EULA at installation or in the files (and I have tons of collections like these). Most of them were games you had to extract from rather than the ROMs being included (the Sega Mega Drive and Genesis Classic Collection had no EULA either though).


  • @themazingness Interesting, thanks for sharing your finds.


  • @themazingness said in Where to (legally) acquire content to play on RetroPie:

    Atari Vault says you can't play it on unauthorized devices.

    Authorized by whom?


  • @BenMcLean Hmm... I tried but I can't get the EULA to show up again by uninstalling and reinstalling. Presumably Atari.

    I feel like EULAs should be required by law to be a text file for computer licenses. It shouldn't need to rely on arbitrary installation conditions to access them.


  • https://store.steampowered.com//eula/400020_eula_0

    You can read for yourself. They're also easier to find than I realized. There is a EULA for every game on Steam as far as I can tell. They're on their store page on the right hand side after the list of features. So my previous post about the games not having EULAs at installation can be true sometimes (there seems to be an algorithm there to detect if you have accepted it recently). But they all seem to be on the store page.


  • Fun fact: According to the German Wikipedia, in Austria and Germany, any EULA that isn't presented to the buyer before the purchase is legally void. This even applies if the user is forced to agree to it afterwards to be able to install the software.

    Furthermore, even a correctly presented EULA may be partially ineffective if it violates the laws on AGB (Allgemeine Geschäftsbedingungen, General Terms and Conditions of Business).


  • Because of the Halloween Steam sale, I was able to confirm some more Piko Interactive games that have SNES ROMs available by simply renaming (and adding a .sfc file extension) the game file in the res folder (as described in my post about Piko Interactive, a few posts above this one).

    Dorke and Ymp
    Gourmet Warriors
    Iron Commando
    Legend
    Jim Power

    Note that Jim Power has 2 versions of the ROM, the original and an enhanced version (in two separate folders within the res folder).

    Also, no EULA on these :)


  • I can confirm Dragonview works with the above method as well (rename "game" to a .sfc) and has no EULA.


  • Don't know if anyone said this but archive site has a ton for you to use for free as long as it isn't commercially.

    I have been using Google and using search criteria: internet archive <system name> ROMs and I currently have about 15 different sites ranging from Atari to PSX.

    Enjoy and have fun!

  • Global Moderator

    @dan1300 Please, no links to ROM sites. The archive site has a special DMCA exemption for the US, but it's not a legal avenue to get ROMs/games.


  • @mitu I was always wondering why the links to archive site are allowed (across the board on other communities as well). The site contains illegal hosted ROMs.

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